DIA Events Calendar 2017

DIA Events Calendar 2017 – Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) calendar featuring special events, exhibits and programs. 2017 DIA events calendar. Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted.

Below are the highlights of the DIA Events Calendar 2017 calendar featuring special events, exhibits and programs.

For more DIA Events Calendar information, call 313-833-7900 or visit Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) website www.dia.org.

DIA Events Calendar October 2017

Detroit Film Theatre: TBA
The Detroit Film Theatre showcases the best of contemporary and classic world cinema. Tickets: $9.50 for general admission and $7.50 for members, seniors and students.

General Guided Tours: Tuesdays–Thursdays, 1 p.m.; Fridays, 1 & 6 p.m.
Enjoy a guided tour of select galleries for an overview of the collection.

General and Family Guided Tours: Saturdays & Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.
Enjoy a guided tour of select galleries or a family and kid-friendly tour.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m.; Sundays, Noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Friday, 6–9 p.m. | Saturday & Sunday, Noon–4 p.m.
Spinners: Sunday, October 1
Have fun making this retro toy from simple materials.
Retablos: Friday, October 6–Sunday, October 8
A retablo is a small painting enshrining an important person, place or thing. Learn about this Latin American folk art tradition while you create one of your own.
Paper Dolls: Friday, October 13–Sunday, October 15
Use one of our patterns or make your own, then design one-of-a-kind clothing for a paper doll.
Sugar Skulls: Friday, October 20–Sunday, October 22 & Friday, October 27–Sunday, October 29
Learn how sugar skulls are used for Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexican and Mexican American communities while you decorate one of your own.

Thursday, October 19
Thursdays at the Museum: Art Making: Sugar Skulls: 1 p.m.
Learn how sugar skulls are used for Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexican and Mexican American communities while your decorate one of your own.

Friday, October 20
Lecture: “The Travels of Frederic Church: From The Heart of the Andes to the Mount of Olives and Beyond,”: 6 p.m.
Frank Kelly, deputy director and chief curator of the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. helps us celebrate the opening weekend of “Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage.” Dr. Kelly suggests that Church’s desire to see places he had read about shaped his travels, as his travels shaped his art. This event is for members only. To learn more about memberships at the DIA, visit www.dia.org/support/membership.

Friday Night Live: Mr. Ho’s Orchestrotica Quintet: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Percussionist Brian O’Neill leads a team of five musicians, who collaborate on instruments foreign and domestic to form modern compositions. From the high arts of jazz and chamber music to adaptations of mid-century exotica and pop art, Mr. Ho’s Orchestrotica performs O’Neill’s original compositions and adaptions of Bach, Gershwin, Shostakovich and John Adams.

Saturday, October 21
Detroit Industry Murals: Labor Tours: 11 a.m.
In partnership with the Michigan Labor History Society, the DIA will host guided tours of Diego Rivera’s “Detroit Industry” murals, focusing on city’s labor history. Tours will meet in Rivera Court.

Lecture: “Framing our Monet”: 2 p.m.
The DIA’s sole painting by Claude Monet—known for nearly 100 years as “Gladioli”—is a favorite among our visitors. But where, why, and how did Monet execute our masterpiece? And what happened to it when it left the artist’s hands? Join “Monet: Framing Life” exhibition curator Jill Shaw to explore new research findings that have led the museum to retitle our painting and better understand its creation as an experiment in the development of Impressionism. This event is for members only. To learn more about memberships at the DIA, visit www.dia.org/support/membership.

Sunday, October 22
Detroit Industry Murals: Labor Tours: 11 a.m.
See Oct. 21 for description.

Wednesday, October 25
Arts + Minds: “Putting it Together: Organizing the Exhibition, Church: An Artist’s Pilgrimage: 6:30 p.m.
Where do museum exhibitions come from? The idea for the DIA’s “Church: An Artist’s Pilgrimage” began with curator of American art, Kenneth Myers, who wanted to know more about the paintings that came out of Frederic Church’s 1867–69 trip to the Middle East, Italy, and Greece.

Thursday, October 26
Thursdays at the Museum: Film Matinee: “The Freshman”: 1 p.m.
Harold Lloyd’s biggest box-office hit was this silent comedy dazzler, featuring the befuddled everyman at his eager best as a new college student. Though he dreams of being a big man on campus, the freshman’s plans go hilariously awry—but he gets a climactic chance to prove his mettle in one of the most famous sports sequences ever filmed. Restored, with a new orchestral score by Carl Davis. Every Thursday at 1 p.m. the Detroit Institute of Arts offers free programs for adults 55+.

Friday, October 27
Friday Night Live: Gaida: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Detroit-born singer Gaida will perform the traditional music of her Syrian heritage, with hints of bossa-nova, belly dance and swing.

Detroit Film Theatre: “The Old Dark House”: 7 p.m.
Five travelers take refuge in a gloomy mansion, where they find themselves menaced by a monstrous, aristocrat family. Based on J.B. Priestley’s novel Benighted. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Night of the Living Dead”: 9:30 p.m.
The late director George Romero rewrote the history of American horror films with Night of the Living Dead, which follows a group that barricades themselves in an old farmhouse to avoid flesh-eating zombies. An unrelenting, darkly funny, tale of a frenzied population devouring itself as it redefines the meaning of “civilization.” Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Saturday, October 28
Detroit Institute of Awesome: Art Demo: Hair Sculpting: Noon–4 p.m.
Kristina Beaty, uses sculpting and the manipulation of hair to create everything from elegant bridal coiffures to extravagant avant-garde and fantasy hair sculptures. She explains the meanings and inspirations for hair design. Some audience members may even get the chance to model one of her gravity-defying works.

Detroit Film Theatre: “The Old Dark House”: 4 p.m.
See Oct. 27 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Night of the Living Dead”: 7 p.m.
See Oct. 27 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “The Crazies”: 9:30 p.m.
When a biochemical spill takes place in a small Pennsylvania town, infected citizens turn homicidal. Though the military tries to contain the damage, it quickly becomes impossible to tell the difference between the “biologically crazy” and those panicked opportunists who seize the situation to declare open season on troublesome friends and family. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Sunday, October 29
Detroit Institute of Awesome: Art Demo: Hair Sculpting: Noon–4 p.m.
See Oct. 28 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “The Old Dark House”: 2 p.m.
See Oct. 27 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Night of the Living Dead”: 4:30 p.m.
See Oct. 27 for description.

DIA Events Calendar November 2017

Special Holiday Hours:
Thursday, November 23: Closed

Exhibitions:
“Ofrendas: Celebrating el Día de Muertos” on view through Nov. 12.
“Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage” on view through January 15, 2018.
“D-Cyphered: Portraits by Jenny Risher” on view through February 18, 2018.
“Monet: Framing of Life” on view through March 4, 2018.

General Guided Tours: Tuesdays–Thursdays, 1 p.m.; Fridays, 1 & 6 p.m.
Enjoy a guided tour of select galleries for an overview of the collection.

General and Family Guided Tours: Saturdays & Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.
Enjoy a guided tour of select galleries or a family and kid-friendly tour.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m.; Saturdays & Sundays, Noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Friday, 6–9 p.m. | Saturday & Sunday, Noon–4 p.m.
Uchiwa: Friday, Nov. 3
Uchiwa is a style of paper fan common in Japan. Learn about its tradition and make a fan of your own.
Collage Portraits: Friday–Sunday, Nov. 10–12
The term collage derives from the French coller, to glue. It was coined in the early 20th century to describe artwork made from an assemblage of different materials. Use this distinctive process to create a portrait out of a mix of papers, cloth and other simple objects.
Watercolor Postcards: Friday–Sunday, Nov. 17–19
Create postcards of your own design using watercolor paints to send to friends and family.

Special Holiday Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Finger Puppets: Friday, Nov. 24; Noon–9 p.m.
Take a finger from a glove and bring it to life as you decorate it with a variety of art-making materials.
Creature Marionette Puppets: Saturday, Nov. 26; Noon–4 p.m.
Turn a butterfly, snake, spider, fish, or a creature of your own imagination into a whimsical marionette.
Clay Pencil-Topper Puppets: Sunday, Nov. 27, Noon–4 p.m.
Create your own puppet characters from self-hardening modeling material.

Thursday, November 2
Thursdays at the Museum: Tour: 1 p.m.
Enjoy a highlights tour of the DIA’s permanent collection. Every Thursday at 1 p.m., the Detroit Institute of Arts offers free programs for adults 55+.

Friday, November 3
Drawing in the Galleries: European Medieval & Renaissance: 6–9 p.m.

Saturday, November 4
Japan Cultural Days: Japanese Master Artist Booths: 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
Visit seven Japanese Master Artists as they present their crafts throughout the weekend, including artists specializing in tenugiu, woodcarving, dyed textiles, pottery, Japanese Edo dolls and Washi paper. Works will be available to purchase from the Master artists on site.

Japan Cultural Days: Bonote Martial Arts Demonstrations: 10:30–11:10 a.m.|1–1:40 p.m.|3:10–3:50 p.m.
Bonote, meaning “hand with stick,” is a form of martial arts developed about 460 years ago in Japan’s feudal era. Samurai Lord Nobunaga Oda transformed the farmers of his land into the most fearsome warriors using only spears and sticks. As feudal times ended, the art of Bonote was preserved and passed down to younger generations through demonstrations, both regionally in Japan and abroad.

Japan Cultural Days: Lecture: “Celebration of Life: Ceramic Art of Tomoko Konno”: 3–4 p.m.
Life has served as the center of Japanese ceramic artist Tomoko Konno’s creative mind. She enjoys giving her ceramics new life by taking inspirations from all kinds of natural organisms. In this dialogue with Natsu Oyobe, curator of Asian Art at the University of Michigan Museum of Art, Konno discusses the ideas and the processes behind her fascinating work

Japan Cultural Days: Artist Workshops: Tie Dyeing with Setsuko Hayashi: 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Master Hayashi shows examples of her Shibori products featuring special, shape-resist dyeing techniques, called Itajime-Shibori. She then demonstrates and teaches the techniques to the class. Each participant tie dyes a provided 11 x 60 inch white silk scarf, taking home a one-of-a-kind creation at the end of the workshop. Cost is $25, pre-registration is required. Details TBA.

Japan Cultural Days: Japanese Kikuno-kai Dance Troupe: 11 a.m.–noon | 2:40–3:40 p.m.
Specializing in Japanese classic and folk dances, Kikuno-kai was founded in 1972 by the late Michiyo Hata, a professional dancer, best known for her choreography in the 1988 Oscar-winning Japanese film Dreams. She founded the troupe to show the beauty of Japanese dancing wherever it could be presented—in Japan and abroad. Kikuno-kai focuses on the fundamentals of Japanese dance while striving to foster emerging artists and create pieces that befit the times. Their show features a variety of traditional and local favorites.

Drawing in the Galleries: Islamic World: Noon–4 p.m.

Japan Cultural Days: Karuta: Waka Lecture and Game Demonstration: Noon–12:40
Karuta is a Japanese card matching game. A traditional Japanese poem (Waka) is written on one set of cards, the Yomifuda, and only the last few lines of the same poem is written on the other, the Torifuda. The idea is for players to grab the right Torifuda card to match the Yomifuda card before their opponents. Players will discuss Waka poetry, the history and uses of the game and demonstrate how it is played.

Japan Cultural Days: Japanese Animated Film: “Kimi no Na Wa”: 12:20 p.m.
Translated as “Your Name,” “Kimi no Na Wa” follows a teenage boy and girl living two separate lives but with a strange connection: one morning they awake to find their lives have switched, and they must learn to communicate and change their world. As their lives continue to intertwine, the pair continues moving forward hoping that one day, they will meet. Japan’s number one film of 2016, has been described as “the country’s most stunning anime ever,” by Variety magazine. In Japanese with English subtitles. Admission is free.

Japan Cultural Days: Lecture: “Doll making, Master and Disciple: Teacher Relations”: 12:40–1–40 p.m.
Master Fujimura talks about his experiences as an apprentice in doll making and what the future holds for apprenticeships in the craft.

Japan Cultural Days: Artist Workshops: Washi Paper Making with Masters Kano: 1:15–2:45 p.m.
Masters Kano teach the class the background, use, purposes and environmental factors of Washi paper. They then show participants how to make their own Washi paper using either traditional or modern tools (participant’s choice). Students go home with the Japanese Washi paper they created. Cost is $25, pre-registration is required. Details TBA.

Japan Cultural Days: Artist Workshops: Master Kinoshita’s Pottery: 3:30–5 p.m.
Master Kinoshita describes and shows the process for his uniquely styled ceramic pieces. He then demonstrates and teaches participants how to use a potter’s wheel, presenting hands-on techniques that allow students to make their own ceramic bowls. Each bowl will be properly baked and later delivered to the participant’s home. Cost is $25, pre-registration is required. Details TBA.
Japan Cultural Days: Kikuno-kai Japanese Dancers: Awo dori Parade: 4:30–5 p.m.
Choreographed dancers and musicians dance, sing and chant as they parade through the streets. In the Rivera Court, the Kikuno-kai dancers, wearing traditional costumes, perform a shortened version of these dances. Audience participation is welcome.

Sunday, November 5
Japan Cultural Days: Japanese Master Artist Booths: 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
See Nov. 4 for description.

Japan Cultural Days: Food Demonstrations
See how Japanese sweets are made and sample Japanese teas throughout the day.

Japan Cultural Days: Artist Workshops: Tie Dyeing with Setsuko Hayashi: 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
See Nov. 4 for description.

Japan Cultural Days: Japanese Kikuno-kai Dance Troupe: 11 a.m.–noon | 2:40–3:40 p.m.
See Nov. 4 for description.

Japanese Cultural Days: Karuta: Waka Lecture and Game Demonstration: 11–11:40 a.m.| 1:50–2:30 p.m.
See Nov. 4 for description.

Drawing in the Galleries: Contemporary: Noon–4 p.m.

Japan Cultural Days: Karuta: Waka Lecture and Game Demonstration: 12:20–1 p.m.| 3:10–3:50 p.m.
See Nov. 4 for description.

Japan Cultural Days: Lecture: “Tale of Tengui”: 12:40–1:40 p.m.
Master Kawakami discusses his design and painting work as part of Tenugui making. He also talk about the history of Tenugui, how it was first made and how it reflects the Edo era and people’s lives at that time.

Japan Cultural Days: Artist Workshops: Washi Paper Making with Masters Kano: 1:15–2:45 p.m.
See Nov. 4 for description.

Japan Cultural Days: Artist Workshops: Master Kinoshita’s Pottery: 3:30–5 p.m.
See Nov. 4 for description.

Wednesday, November 8
Lecture: Monet and Japonisme: 6 p.m.
Join Jill Shaw, associate curator of European Art (1850–1950) and curator of the DIA’s exhibition “Monet: Framing Life,” for a talk on how Monet’s fascination with Japanese art influenced his artistic practice in the second half of the 19th century. The talk will be followed by an exclusive evening in the exhibition, “Monet: Framing Life,” with a private reception. Tickets are $65, but subject to change.

Thursday, November 9
Thursdays at the Museum: Art Talk: “Vogue”: 1 p.m.
Throughout history, humans have used fashion, jewelry and body art as a form of personal expression and cultural identity. You may be surprised about what you’ll learn about the subject through exploring objects in the DIA’s collection. Every Thursday at 1 p.m. the DIA offers free programs for adults 55+.

Lecture: “Blooks: The Art of Books that Aren’t”: 7 p.m.
For hundreds of years, people have been making, collecting and presenting everyday objects that look like books. They have been passed down through the generations; many thousands reside in private homes, public museums and libraries around the world. Mindell Dubansky discusses the history of book-shaped objects, or what she calls “blooks.”

Detroit Film Theatre: “Theeb”: 7 p.m.
In 1916, with war raging in the Ottoman Empire, the peaceful existence of two recently orphaned, closely-bound Bedouin brothers is interrupted when a British Army officer asks for help in finding the location of a rumored source of water near the Ottoman train tracks. This series of three films explores the social and political landscape of the Middle East at the turn of the 20th and 21st centuries. Presented in conjunction with the DIA’s exhibition “Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage,” on view through Jan. 15, 2018.

Friday, November 10
Drawing in the Galleries: American, Arts & Crafts, Art Nouveau: 6–9 p.m.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Human Flow”: 7 p.m.
Filmed in 23 countries over the course of one year, “Human Flow” follows a chain of human stories that depict their subjects desperate search for safety, shelter and justice in the face of the overwhelming effects of climate change. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Saturday, November 11
Drawing in the Galleries: Arts of Africa: Noon–4 p.m.

Detroit Institute of Awesome: Artist Demonstration: Something Old, Something New: An Intro to Mixed Media and Collage: Noon–4 p.m.
Detroit-based artist Lindsay Cahill shows visitors how to take previously manufactured images and deconstruct them into collage elements. Visitors will be able to make a collage self-portrait, using such things as rubber stamps and magazine clippings, among others.

Sunday, November 12
Drawing in the Galleries: American: Noon–4 p.m.

Detroit Institute of Awesome: Artist Demonstration: Something Old, Something New: An Intro to Mixed Media and Collage: Noon–4 p.m.
See Nov. 11 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Human Flow”: 2 & 5 p.m.
See Nov. 10 for description.

Lecture: Ofrenda Artist Talk: 3 p.m.
As part of the DIA’s community exhibition “Ofrendas: Celebrating el Día de Muertos,” the artists who designed the exhibition’s ofrenda altars, along with members of the Mexican Consulate, will explore the rich history of Día de Meurtos (Day of the Dead), the tradition of ofrendas and give insight into the meaning and inspiration behind their creations.

Thursday, November 16
Thursdays at the Museum: Art Making: Uchiwa: 1 p.m.
Uchiwa is a style of paper fan common in Japan. Learn about its tradition as you create your own fan. Every Thursday at 1 p.m. the DIA offers free programs for adults 55+.

Friday, November 17
Drawing in the Galleries: European Medieval & Renaissance: 6–9 p.m.

Detroit Film Theatre & Friday Night Live: The Films of Mohammed Bayoumi with live accompaniment by the National Arab Orchestra: 8 p.m.
Friday Night Live, the Detroit Film Theatre and the Arab American National Museum’s Global Fridays series unite for the world premiere of an original score by Michael Ibrahim, founder and director of the National Arab Orchestra (NAO). This performance by the NAO Takht Ensemble will be paired live with rarely seen silent films from the 1920s and 1930s by pioneering Egyptian director Mohammed Bayoumi.

Saturday, November 18
Drawing in the Galleries: Modern: Noon–4 p.m.

Detroit Institute of Awesome: DFT Animation Club: “Looney Tunes Classics”: 2 p.m.
The Detroit Film Theatre unspools some of the best and most hilarious Warner Brothers’ Looney Tunes shorts. Immortal stars such as Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Road Runner, Tweety and Sylvester, Marvin the Martian, Elmer Fudd, Michigan J. Frog and many more will strut their stuff on the big DFT screen. Tickets: $5 general admission, free for DIA members

Detroit Film Theatre: “Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge”: 9:30 p.m.
The first woman to win the Nobel Prize, Polish-born Marie Sklodowska Curie spent her life setting precedents as a physicist, chemist and pioneer in the discovery and study of radioactivity. Following the accidental death in 1906 of her husband and research partner Pierre, Marie discovers that she must fight the discrimination and condescension of a male-dominated academic and scientific establishment to continue her work. In French with English subtitles. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Sunday, November 19
Drawing in the Galleries: European: Dutch Golden Age: Noon–4 p.m.

Detroit Institute of Awesome: DFT Animation Club: “Looney Tunes Classics”: 2 p.m.
See Nov. 18 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge”: 4:30 p.m.
See Nov. 18 for description.

Friday, November 24
Drawing in the Galleries: Arts of Africa: 6–9 p.m.

Friday Night Live: The Lincoln Trio: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
The Grammy-nominated Lincoln Trio performs well-known chamber works with contemporary touches.

Detroit Film Theatre: “The Square”: 7 p.m.
The director of a renowned contemporary art museum is persuaded by his marketing staff that the institution would benefit from a form of bold performance art that could become a phenomenon on social media. He settles on an installation meant to promote “responsible behavior.” When the director’s phone is stolen, events take an alarming new direction, accelerated by the director’s dalliance with a reporter whose behavior redefines “inappropriate.” In English, Swedish and Danish, with English subtitles. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Chavela”: 9:45 p.m.
“Chavela” looks at the unconventional life of beloved singer Chavela Vargas, whose renditions of Mexican music when she returned to the stage late in life earned her a new level of fame. When she was 14, Chavela ran away to sing in the streets of Mexico City and was a household name by the 1950s. She was sexual pioneer, having many female lovers at a time when being out in Mexico was dangerous. In Spanish with English subtitles. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Saturday, November 25
Drawing in the Galleries: Modern: Noon–4 p.m.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Chavela”: 1 p.m.
See November 24 for details.

Detroit Institute of Awesome: Puppet Performance: “Una luna entre dos casas”/“A Moon Between Two Houses”: 2 p.m.

Marionetas de la Esquina, an internationally renowned puppet troupe form Mexico City, uses live music, colorful sets and rod puppets, to explore the power of friendship through the story of two children with very different personalities who share a common fear. Performances are in English and Spanish.

Detroit Film Theatre: “The Square”: 3:30, 7 & 9:45 p.m.
See November 24 for description.

Sunday, November 26
Drawing in the Galleries: European: Dutch Golden Age: Noon–4 p.m.

Detroit Institute of Awesome: Puppet Performance: “Una luna entre dos casas”/“A Moon Between Two Houses”: 2 p.m.

See Nov. 25 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “The Square”: 2 p.m.
See November 24 for description.

Detroit Film Theatre: “Chavela”: 5 p.m.
See Nov. 24 for description.

Sunday, November 27
Detroit Institute of Awesome: Puppet Performance: “Una luna entre dos casas”/“A Moon Between Two Houses”: 2 p.m.

See Nov. 24 for description.

Thursday, November 30
Thursdays at the Museum: Tour: 1 p.m.
Enjoy a highlights tour of the DIA’s permanent collection. Every Thursday at 1 p.m., the DIA offers free programs for adults 55+.

DIA Events Calendar December 2017

Special Holiday Hours
Sunday–Monday, Dec. 24–25: CLOSED
Tuesday–Saturday, Dec. 26–30: 10 a.m.–7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 31: 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 1: CLOSED

Exhibitions
“Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage” on view through Jan. 15, 2018.
“D-Cyphered: Portraits by Jenny Risher” on view through Feb. 18, 2018.
“Monet: Framing Life” on view through March 4, 2018.

Ongoing
General Guided Tours: Tuesdays–Thursdays, 1 p.m.; Fridays, 1 & 6 p.m.
Enjoy a guided tour of select galleries for an overview of the collection.

General and Family Guided Tours: Saturdays & Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.
Enjoy a guided tour of select galleries or a family and kid-friendly tour.

Thursdays at the Museum, 1 p.m.
Special programs, including tours, talks and art-making, are offered to adults 55+ along with light refreshments.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m.; Saturdays & Sundays, Noon–4 p.m.
Note: Saturday, Dec. 30, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 31, 11 a.m.– 4 p.m.

Drop-In Art-making (for all ages) Fridays, 6–9 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, Noon–4 p.m.
Dec. 1–3, Luminaries: Decorate a glass jar you can later illuminate with a small candle.
Dec. 2, 5–9 p.m.: Noel Night Winter Village II: Take part in a community-based art-making project, where participants help create a large rendition of a Winter Village.
Dec. 8–10, Printmaking – Notecards
Dec. 15–17, Paper Snowflakes
Dec. 22–23, Star Books

Special Holiday Week Drop-in Art-making: Puppets
Thursday, Dec. 28, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 29, Noon–9 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 30, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 31, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 5
Talk: Reification and Reconciliation in an Age of Conversion and Translation: The Message of Toledo’s Choir Screen 6 p.m.
Discover the story behind an unusual stone screen added to the choir of the Cathedral of Toledo, Spain around the 1380s.

Friday, Dec. 8
Friday Night Live! Piano Duo X88: Outer Limits 7 and 8:30 p.m.
Outer Limits is a program by four diverse composers: Tristan Perich (USA), Nik Bärtsch (Switzerland), Pete Harden (UK/The Netherlands) and Vanessa Lann (USA/The Netherlands). Perich’s work features two dueling pianos juxtaposed against a web of 1-bit electronics. Bärtsch’s three-movement work conjures deep rhythmic grooves and virtuosic unison licks with mesmerizing suspension. Harden’s work is an improvised map of sounds, based on butterfly migration patterns, and Lann creates a theatrical work with poetry and movement.

Saturday–Sunday, Dec. 9–10
Artist Demonstration: Linocut Workshop with Carl Wilson Noon–4 p.m.
Prominent local artist Carl Wilson displays his art and guides visitors in carving their own foam linocut. Participants can then visit the Studio to make a print from their linocut.

Friday, Dec. 15
Friday Night Live! Miz Corona 7 and 8:30 p.m.
Miz Korona is a critically acclaimed underground artist from Detroit who constructs lyrics that speak honestly to the realities of life. She blends her genuine love for hip hop with a taste of the classic soul of The Motor City to create her own style upon which to express these messages.
Detroit Film Theatre: “The Other Side of Hope” 7 p.m.
Two refugees who meet in a Helsinki holding cell are unaware that, at the same time, a middle-aged traveling shirt salesman is fleeing his marriage to try his hand at the restaurant business. At his dive of an eatery—The Golden Pint—these three lives come together in a series of comic, moving surprises. In Finnish, English, Arabic and Swedish with English subtitles. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Saturday, Dec. 16
Stories and Dances of the Ho-Chunk Nation 2 p.m.
Reg Pettibone, a Native American champion dancer from the Ho-Chunk Nation, and members of his family, present true Native American culture through dance, song, narration and a display of artifacts with a strong environmental emphasis. For all ages.
Detroit Film Theatre: “Night School” 4 p.m.
This documentary is about three African-American adults who are determined to better their lives by resuming their pursuit of high school diplomas. They are concerned that a GED may not be enough; they want the opportunities they believe will come with a regular diploma. While each of their journeys is distinct, the systemic, poverty-induced obstacles are widespread. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.
Detroit Film Theatre: “The Other Side of Hope” 7 and 9:30 p.m.
(see Dec. 15 for description)

Sunday, Dec. 17
Stories and Dances of the Ho-Chunk Nation 2 p.m.
(See Dec. 16 for description)
Detroit Film Theatre: “The Other Side of Hope” 2 p.m.
(see Dec. 15 for description)
Detroit Film Theatre: “Night School” 4:30 p.m.
(see Dec. 16 for description)

Friday, Dec. 22
Detroit Film Theatre: “Lawrence of Arabia” (restored) 7 p.m. (227 minutes, with intermission)
“Lawrence of Arabia,” winner of seven Academy Awards, is a 1962 epic historical drama based on the life of T.E. Lawrence, the Englishman (Peter O’Toole) who sought to unite Arab tribes against the Ottoman Empire during World War I. In addition to Lawrence’s attacks on Aqaba and Damascus and involvement in the Arab National Council, the film delves into his struggles with the personal violence of war, his identity and his divided allegiance between his native Britain and his new-found comrades within the Arabian desert tribes. In 2012, the Cannes Film Festival premiered this frame-by-frame 4K digital restoration. With Omar Sharif and Alec Guinness. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.
Friday Night Live! Karen Marie Richardson: Ella Fitzgerald Centenary Celebration 7 and 8:30 p.m.
Vocalist, songwriter and actress Karen Marie Richardson celebrates the centenary of the birth of the First Lady of Song, Ella Fitzgerald. Richardson currently stars in the off-Broadway sensation Sleep No More as jazz chanteuse Stella Sinclair and will appear in the upcoming movie adaptation of the musical Hello Again.

Tuesday, Dec. 26
Puppet Performance: The Winter Wonderland Puppet Concert 2 p.m.
Kevin Kammeraad and the Cooperfly Puppet Troupe present a cast of puppet characters in an interactive concert of holiday favorites and a few easy-to-learn originals.
Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows Awards 3, 5 and 7 p.m.
The British advertising industry presents “British Arrows” awards to recognize the creativity of television ads in the UK. The inventiveness of these British commercials, many of which ingeniously withhold their purpose until the very end, provides a playful, uniquely satisfying kick. Tickets: $9.50 general admission, $7.50 seniors, students, DIA Members.

Wednesday, Dec. 27
Puppet Performance: The Winter Wonderland Puppet Concert 2 p.m.
(see Dec. 26 for description)
Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows Awards 3, 5 and 7 p.m.
(see Dec. 26 for description)

Friday, Dec. 29
Detroit Film Theatre: Tea Time Theatre: “Napping Princess” 2 p.m.
Three days before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, Kokone should be studying for her exams but often dozes off, stuck between reality and a dream world full of fantastic motorized contraptions. When her father finds himself in trouble, Kokone realizes that her dreams hold the answers to his dilemma, and she embarks on a journey that traverses dreams and reality, city and country, past and present. This original anime adventure weaves together the rapidly evolving technology of today’s world with the fantastic imagination of a new generation, showing how following your dreams can be the best way to face the future. Come early, all-ages tea party starts at 1 p.m. Free admission.
Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows Awards 5 and 7 p.m.
(see Dec. 26 for description)

Saturday, Dec. 30
Detroit Film Theatre: Tea Time Theatre: “April and the Extraordinary World” 2 p.m.
In this sci-fi adventure set in an alternate steampunk universe, a family of scientists is on the brink of a great discovery when a mysterious force abducts them, leaving their young daughter April behind. Ten years later, April and her cat, Darwin, find themselves at the center of a shadowy conspiracy and are soon on the run from secret agents, bicycle-powered dirigibles and cyborg-rat spies. Come early; all-ages tea party starts at 1 p.m. Free admission.
Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows Awards 5 and 7 p.m.
(see Dec. 26 for description)

Sunday, Dec. 31
Detroit Film Theatre: Tea Time Theatre: “Whisper of the Heart” 2 p.m.
Perusing books she has checked out from the library, Shizuku’s curiosity is piqued when she notices a boy’s name that appears above hers on the checkout card of each one. Through a series of magical incidents. she connects with the boy, who has dreams of becoming a famous violinmaker, while she aspires to be a writer. This masterwork is the only full-length feature by Yoshifumi Kondo, protégé of Hayao Miyazaki (“My Neighbor Totoro”) and is regarded as one of the classics of Japanese anime. In English. Come early, all-ages tea party starts at 1 p.m. Free admission.
Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows Awards 5 p.m.

Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9a–4p Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9a–10p Fridays, and 10a–5p Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $14 for adults, $9 for seniors ages 62+, $8 ages 6–17. General Admission (excludes ticketed attractions) is FREE for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties and DIA members. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera’s world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

This DIA Events Calendar 2017 page is intended to be used as a guide. Oakland County Moms does not endorse these events. Oakland County Moms is not responsible for changes to event descriptions, event times or details being altered without notice or cancellations.

Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) programs are made possible with support from the City of Detroit.

For more DIA Events Calendar 2017 events and info, please visit www.dia.org.